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The Endearing Quokka WIPV2 WL184092

Navigator Willem de Vlamingh first recorded the quokka - a small wallaby initially thought to be a rat - on Rottnest Island in 1696. Gregarious and diurnal, quokkas form hierarchical colonies that congregate around freshwater soaks or densely vegetated swamps. They have become the 'darlings of social media' due primarily to the perceived cuteness and acceptance of human presence on Islands like Rottnest. Apart from some small pockets, they are all but extinct on the Australian Mainland.
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© Nature Connect Pty Ltd- © Nature Connect Pty Ltd- Steve Parish Photography © Nature Connect Pty Ltd- Steve Parish Photography
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Contained in galleries
MAD ABOUT MACROPODS, WILDLIFE CONNECTIONS
Navigator Willem de Vlamingh first recorded the quokka - a small wallaby initially thought to be a rat - on Rottnest Island in 1696.  Gregarious and diurnal, quokkas form hierarchical colonies that congregate around freshwater soaks or densely vegetated swamps.  They have become the 'darlings of social media' due primarily to the perceived cuteness and acceptance of human presence on Islands like Rottnest.  Apart from some small pockets, they are all but extinct on the Australian Mainland.