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Jump For Joy I CO8485

There are many theories as to why humpback whales jump. I like to believe it is because of a desire to play. It's fascinating to note that several species are known to breach a lot more often during mating season than during their feeding season. Recently, off the coast of southern New South Wales, I witnessed a breathtaking sight of a sizeable solitary male jumping repeatedly for over twenty minutes on a rough and windy day. It was indeed a remarkable experience to see the sheer power and grace of these magnificent creatures.
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© Nature Connect Pty Ltd- Steve Parish Photography © Nature Connect Pty Ltd- Steve Parish Photography
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2000x1000 / 1.6MB
QLD QLD
www.gallery.steveparish-natureconnect.com.au www.gallery.steveparish-natureconnect.com.au
Contained in galleries
SEA SOUNDS & SALTY AIR, NEW WORK, OCEAN OF LIFE
There are many theories as to why humpback whales jump.  I like to believe it is because of a desire to play. It's fascinating to note that several species are known to breach a lot more often during mating season than during their feeding season. Recently, off the coast of southern New South Wales, I witnessed a breathtaking sight of a sizeable solitary male jumping repeatedly for over twenty minutes on a rough and windy day. It was indeed a remarkable experience to see the sheer power and grace of these magnificent creatures.