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A TURQUOISE DELIGHT BI3355

This delightful bird prefers open, grassy woodlands with dead trees near permanent water. They forage on or near the ground for seeds of grasses and shrubs, flowers, nectar, fruits, leaves, and scale insects. They make soft, metallic-sounding notes when in flight and high-pitched, weak, twittering sounds while roosting or feeding. The species nests in vertical or near-vertical hollows in living or dead trees, laying between two to five eggs. The Turquoise Parrot was considered extinct in the wild by 1917 but has since recovered in the Cumberland region of outer Sydney and Southern Highlands areas.
Copyright
Steve Parish Nature Connect © Nature Connect Pty Ltd - Photo Steve Parish © Nature Connect Pty Ltd - Photo Steve Parish
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QLD QLD
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NEW WORK, FOR THE LOVE OF BIRDS
This delightful bird prefers open, grassy woodlands with dead trees near permanent water. They forage on or near the ground for seeds of grasses and shrubs, flowers, nectar, fruits, leaves, and scale insects. They make soft, metallic-sounding notes when in flight and high-pitched, weak, twittering sounds while roosting or feeding. The species nests in vertical or near-vertical hollows in living or dead trees, laying between two to five eggs. The Turquoise Parrot was considered extinct in the wild by 1917 but has since recovered in the Cumberland region of outer Sydney and Southern Highlands areas.