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The Gathering BI9773

Carnaby's black cockatoos build their nests in hollows of Eucalyptus trees, which are usually high up in the trees. However, due to habitat loss caused by land clearing and development, their survival is at risk. Therefore, the Federal and Western Australian governments have listed Carnaby's black cockatoo as an endangered species. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has also classified this species as endangered. As a big fan of parrots, it was thrilling for me to see a small flock of male and female Carnaby's black cockatoos on their far northern recorded range at Kalbari National Park in Western Australia.
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Steve Parish Nature Connect
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FOR THE LOVE OF BIRDS
Carnaby's black cockatoos build their nests in hollows of Eucalyptus trees, which are usually high up in the trees. However, due to habitat loss caused by land clearing and development, their survival is at risk. Therefore, the Federal and Western Australian governments have listed Carnaby's black cockatoo as an endangered species. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has also classified this species as endangered. As a big fan of parrots, it was thrilling for me to see a small flock of male and female Carnaby's black cockatoos on their far northern recorded range at Kalbari National Park in Western Australia.